Justice, Freedom, Humanhood

Savings and Investment Culture in Africa

Dambisa Moyo in her book Dead Aid advocates for the importance of domestic savings (among other mechanics) to stimulate African economic growth. A call that has been echoed through the Davos sessions during World Economic Forums. One voice coming from world leaders and most African leaders that Africa needs to promote a saving and investment culture through banking the unbanked and financial inclusion. We are yet to see governments implementing the necessary actions and regulations required to make this idea a reality. In this 21st century, vast majority of the continent remains unbanked. Obviously, Africa is not a country and...
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Understanding the Human Rights Crisis in Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe’s current situation is difficult to understand if you don’t know where it comes from. The human rights crisis in Zimbabwe is far from anything new. Zimbabwe is a country that has never respected the rights of its people. From the Gukurahundi genocide between 1983 to 1987 where 30,000 Ndebele people were murdered by state security forces, to the countless abductions, torturing’s, killings and rigging we’ve seen at every election under both former President Robert Mugabe and current President Emmerson Mnangagwa. One would think that after the November 2017 Coup d’état Zimbabwe would be on a positive return to democracy...
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Using the COVID-19 pandemic to demand better

As one of the most developed economies in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Africa exists as somewhat of a paradox because it also simultaneously exists as the most economically unequal country in the world. Characterised by high income polarisation, South Africa has a small number of high-income earners, a relatively small middle class and extremely high levels of chronic poverty. It is for this reason that the World Bank credits its Gini Index as the highest in the world. Now, given the rising number of positive COVID-19 cases, one does not have to think too hard about the devasting consequences this will...
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Muscling with legitimacy and the politics of Lockdown amidst the COVID-19 pandemic

–  by Shannon Arnold, Kapil Narain, Pholla Samkezi Mbalane. With almost 2,5 million cases and 200 000 deaths globally, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic escalates.[1] In this unprecedented war, health care systems and frontline workers are overburdened and under-resourced, prompting governments to undertake rapid and decisive public health interventions in an endeavour to contain the pandemic. In South Africa, within 3 weeks of the index case (5 March) a national lockdown was declared by the President (23 March), and swiftly implemented (27 March).[2] It was strange, finding myself on my parents’ couch listening to President Ramaphosa declare a National...
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The Fragility of Developing States and What it Could Mean for the Future

During a time of complete global panic such as this, the stand still that COVID-19 has put the world through could very well serve as an opportune time for us to begin planning ahead for the kind of new world order that humanitarian crisis’ such as the corona virus will have in store for us. The pandemic of corona virus has had governments, heads of state and all social institutions having to face unprecedented and complex challenges which alongside an urgent need to curb the spread of the virus have needed to claim fearsome reactions from the public. More than...
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A People Divided

Against a backdrop of increasing geopolitical tension, it is fair to say that there is a sense in which a cognitive awareness is occurring amongst Africa’s direct descendants. This increased awareness seems to be borne out of a longstanding frustration with the status quo (especially regarding our relation to and place in the world) as well as a desire to reconnect with each other, in an attempt to bridge our gaps of misunderstandings using the common ground we share: a unified heritage and identity, to which we are inextricably bound and upon which we must build our future. The latest...
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Energy Security For Inclusive Growth: The Case of Africa (South Africa)

Enormous progress has been achieved in decreasing global poverty, in the last few years, as the number of persons living in extreme poverty has halved. Despite this feat, most people living in developing economies remain in abject poverty. This is attributed to the fact that in many of these countries, rising prosperity has been accompanied by social exclusion and rising inequality. It is thus pertinent that for household poverty to be eradicated, resources must be distributed fairly across individuals. According to the World Bank, Africa (particularly Sub-Saharan Africa), constitutes the region with the highest prevalence of extreme poverty. Expectedly, this...
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The Vantage Point

I, like many young South Africans have an intriguing story to tell about my family’s experiences of apartheid. From my grandmother’s tearful retelling of life on the farms, to stories of dead bodies strung in the streets of Soweto the morning after armed police forces came and wreaked havoc, to the uncle whose sitting room cabinets are chock-full of African National Congress bric-a-brac, who partook in the 1976 student uprising but never completed schooling and numbs the trauma of that era with drink. The apartheid police forces never let black populations have a sense of normality long enough to believe...
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A Tale of Contrast and Progress

“Too foreign for home, too foreign for here”. When I first read this poem by Ijeoma Umebinyo, an immediate feeling of recognition resonated so deeply in my belly, a feeling I’ve been familiar with my entire life. As a backstory, a somewhat unconventional love story between my resilient Oshiwambo mother and smooth Portuguese/Angolan father brought about the person I am today. I was born and raised in Namibia which ironically enough is described as the country where the ocean meets the desert – a metaphor of two dissimilar entities coming together. This notion has always been very much prevalent in...
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